Unusual Worldwide Museums of Interest to Senior Citizens

Feb 5th, 2010 | By James E Becker | Category: Senior Travel

On one of my last trips to France as a Tour Group Leader with Elderhostel (now Exploritas) we visited a corkscrew museum.  There were a lot of extraordinary and weird corkscrews on display.  Now I know that there must be a museum for just about every item on the planet. 

If you lean toward the unusual, check out a couple of these “out of the ordinary” museums.  

  • Baked Bean Museum of Excellence, Port Talbot, South Wales. In 2003 a wacky Brit (whose real name is Barry Kirk, but he had it legally changed to Captain Beany) converted his two-bedroom flat into a museum where he displays more than 200 baked-bean artifacts.
  • Sulabh International Museum of Toilets, New Delhi. Bindeshwar Pathak, who considers himself a “sanitation crusader,” has traveled the world gathering key information on the history and the evolution of the toilet.
  • London’s Fan Museum, Greenwich, England. Set in two 1721 buildings, this jewel box of a museum is, in a word, fan-tastic. The only museum in the world devoted entirely to the art of fan making, it houses more than 3,500 mostly antique artifacts, some dating from the 11th century. 
  • The Museum of Bad Art, Dedham, Massachusetts. Forget MoMA―check out MoBA, dedicated to the collection and the exhibition of questionable artwork. Most of the collection has been moved to the Dedham Community Theater’s basement, just outside the men’s room. 
  • There are several offbeat museums in New Orleans including the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum. Enter this French Quarter museum and discover the world of antiquated medical devices and the art of voodoo. Keep an eye out for jars of leeches. The tonsil guillotine will leave you, well, speechless.   

Of course there are legitimate museums where you can view classic canvasses. Here is where you can find them:

1. Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Louvre (louvre.fr), Paris.
2. Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night, Museum of Modern Art (moma.org), New York City.
3. Pablo Picasso’s Guernica,Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (museoreinasofia.es), Madrid.
4. Sandro Botticelli’s Birth of Venus,Uffizi Gallery (uffizi.com), Florence.
5. Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss,Österreichische Galerie Belvedere (belvedere.at), Vienna, Austria.
6. Edvard Munch’s The Scream exists in different versions. The Munch Museum (munch.museum.no) and the National Gallery (nationalmuseum.no), both in Oslo, Norway, each own one.
7. Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers series:Among the many museums that display one of these masterpieces are the Neue Pinakothek Museum (pinakothek.de), in Munich, Germany, and the National Gallery (nationalgallery.org.uk), in London.
8. Grant Wood’s American Gothic, the Art Institute of Chicago (artic.edu).

 

Still with me? 9 U.S. Roadside Attractions Worth Braking For

1. World’s Largest Twine Ball, Darwin, Minnesota.

2. World’s Largest Chair,Anniston, Alabama.

3. World’s Largest Pecan, Brunswick, Missouri.

4. World’s Third-Largest Cherry Pie,Charlevoix, Michigan.

5. World’s Largest Baseball Bat, Louisville, Kentucky.

6. America’s Smallest Church, South Newport, Georgia.

7. World’s Largest Basket (which is also a seven-story corporate building), Newark, Ohio.

8. Smallest U.S. Post Office,Ochopee, Florida.

9. Georgia Guidestones(also known as “America’s Stonehenge”), Nuberg, Georgia.          jeb



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  1. [...] Baked Bean Museum of Excellence, Port Talbot, South Wales. In 2003 a wacky Brit (whose real name is Barry Kirk, but he had it legally changed to Captain Beany) converted his two-bedroom flat into a museum where he displays more than 200 baked-bean artifacts. Sulabh International Museum of Toilets, New Delhi. Bindeshwar Pathak, who considers himself a “sanitation crusader,” has traveled the world gathering key information on the history and the evolution of the toilet. You find the original post here http://www.seniorcitizenjou … [...]

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