Posts Tagged ‘ senior citizens ’

Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease, Part 2

Sep 9th, 2016 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Victims of AD need more structure in the Moderate stage. The generally experience sleeplessness, wandering, late-day confusion and agitation which are all part of the same problem. BAI Beacon states, “The damaged brain has to work much harder to understand the environment and be able to function.” (Ibid) People with AD tend to lose their sense of smell and need food that is well or highly seasoned; their eating is disrupted and the challenge for the caregiver is to find and prepare food that is appealing to their care receiver.

Persons in the Moderate stage of AD may resist bathing and need help to dress. They struggle to find words to express what they want to say. They begin to experience illusions and delusions.



Healthcare of the Future

Jan 22nd, 2016 | By Guest Post | Category: Senior Moments Blog

We humans all require healthcare, and senior citizens need more attention to health issues as we age. Unfortunately, one of the main barriers to receiving the necessary level of healthcare is the practical element of being unable to physically access a healthcare professional. However, thanks to advances in technology, this may soon become a thing of the past.

Home Healthcare Adaptations (http://www.home-healthcare-adaptations.ie/), a home care company based in Ireland, created this infographic which explores how the world of healthcare might look in the near future. It profiles the concept of ‘virtual healthcare’, whereby patients can receive a virtual home visit through a hologram of their physician, and also a virtual doctor app where patients can receive information on treatments available to them by simply browsing their smartphone or tablet.



Seniors: How Much More Can You Take?

Feb 2nd, 2011 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Foremost among considerations this February is how much more of this winter weather, assuming you live in that 75% belt where winter is being devilishly present this year, can you take? Having lived in what I consider the metropolitan midwest for 20 years, I finally came to that moment when I could no longer take the wintry blasts and the snowy mornings. Omaha is, certainly more so now, one of the most sophisticated cities in North America.

It has earned its place with cultural events, arts, restaurants, special events, e.g. the College World Series, famous people (Warren Buffett, Bob Boozer, Bob Gibson, et al), educational institutions (University of Nebraska at Omaha and Creighton University), and the Henry Doorly Zoo. It is a first class city with a waterfront and major corporations making the city shine during the day and glow at night. There is just one thing wrong.



Friday, at its Best… Seniors Innocent Holidays

Jul 23rd, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Seniors still find ways to do what Americans have long done. Load up the car for a weekend holiday. Packing the sun screen, swim suits, beach paraphernalia, snacks and pop, adult children and grandkids, and heading for the beach. It was a time of complete freedom and totally released expectations. It was a time when laughter rang in the station wagon and the familiar cry of “are we there yet” sounded like a broken record. It was a time of unfettered fun and fully released energy to enjoy what had always seemed like a necessary rite of summer, swimming and snorkeling and lazing at the beach.

Now, while some are still free and able to do that, others across the vast 84000 square miles of prohibited waters in the Gulf may not. Others must show



On The Road With Elderly Parents

Jul 21st, 2010 | By Jeannine Becker | Category: For Senior Women

We left early on a Friday morning for the Midwest.  My father was finally on the road, returning to his home state.  I’m quite sure that his agenda was to find a home they could live in and make that important move back to his roots where he wanted to die.  We started making plans [...]



A Couple of Bad Days: When Illness Strikes

Jul 15th, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

It had been awhile since I had experienced flu like symptoms. We had just returned from a flight to San Francisco. A couple of days passed and I was suddenly hit with vomiting, fever, and other sundry suggestions that something about the trip didn’t like me. It (the trip) was otherwise quite enjoyable. The consequences, if that is from where it originated, did not. I gave into it. Recognizing there was not much more I could do, I was bed ridden for a couple of days. It started at 1 a.m.and the night was one that promised no enjoyment or relief.

The next day was a day of intermittent sleep, nothing to eat, occasional throwing up and overall discomfort. About all I could get down were some ice chips. And the joy of having a couple of sugarless popsicles, several hours later, was like a feast and banquet all at once. The company of our two pets, who barely left my side, offered solace and reassurance.



Senior Editors Travel to San Francisco

Jul 14th, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

A holiday of several days in the San Francisco area was rewarding, fulfilling and delicious. We were there primarily for a visit with our son, who has lived in San Francisco for 15 years. He knows the city like the back of his hand and is quick to identify great places to dine, wonderful sights to see and pleasant ways to spend our time and daily energy. He is a musician, plays the drums, and was part of the featured group to play at a Friday night cultural event at the deYoung Museum in Golden Gate Park. Sounds impressive. It was and were we ever proud of him and happy to be there.

We stayed at a little boutique hotel near his apartment. We walked a couple of blocks for coffee and rolls every morning. We spent our days sightseeing. We had been to the Bay before, but had not always taken the time to see some of the more famous and less touristy spots. We found one, thanks to the Smithsonian Magazine, south of San Francisco known



Canine and Feline Companions for Senior Citizens

Jul 13th, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Part of the joy of everyday living is having pets. In our case, the pets are canine. One is a daschund, the other a papillion. They are rescues, found on the Internet, while I was recovering from surgery. (www.petfinders.com) That was over two years ago.

They have melted our hearts many times since then. They are more precious than the finest jewels. They are playful, curious, good exercise companions on our daily walks and just plain lovable. When we are away from them, even for a brief few hours, we miss them terribly. Are they spoiled? Of course, but not excessively so. Are they loved? Of course and excessively so! Their companionship offers us the rewards of their unique personalities, the expressions of attention they give to us and receive from us. They are like children, full of surprises. They are like pets, forever loyal. They are Zebediah, our black dachshund and Patton, our white and black papillion.



Seniors Dealing with Disagreement

Jul 8th, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

One of the most disagreeable experiences for senior citizens is to disagree. The human reaction is to fight (argue) or flee (avoid). Conflict usually prompts excessive cortisol in the human body, and too much of that chemical is harmful. It creates discord that sometimes takes a while to dissolve.

Disagreements come with all kind of emotional responses, and some physical, most all without value or good consequences. Effective problem solving usually brings some sort of satisfying calm, but many of us seniors just weren’t taught how to solve problems well. We know how to ‘stand our ground’ and how to use avoidance, but neither is effective in dealing



When the Nest Gets Crowded: Seniors’ Children Come Back Home

Jul 7th, 2010 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

One of the glaring evidences of today’s economic slide comes in the numbers of “children” who are moving back home following college. During the past several decades the shift in persons who have entered college and received their diplomas has increased, while the numbers of available jobs for persons with degrees has not kept pace. This has created a major paradigm shift in living patterns, requiring senior citizens to house their children who have graduated from college, but find themselves unable to find productive employment.

Persons at retirement often look forward to the empty nest. However, statistics show that more and more college graduates are returning to the safe haven of their parents’ home. This creates a new psychological strain on the family, who thought life would look different once it was emptied of children. Instead, some children find themselves in the paradox of being dependent on their parents, a not too encouraging state of being. Others may find some work which assists in meeting some of the increased expenses of their having moved home.