Posts Tagged ‘ loss and grief ’

THE RELIEF OF GRIEF

Aug 20th, 2013 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

More of long time acquaintances and dear friends are reporting the loss of a loved one. Many of the notices indicate the death of a parent, particularly mothers. We are, after all, many of us, at that age when the clock ticks faster and the calendar seems to be turned over too often, too soon.

Many have lost their fathers, years back. Men seen to have shorter life spans. And so, we spread out our grief, extending over several years, so that our adjusting to the loneliness and heart ache that inevitably comes is less difficult.

It is that that draws our attention today. Grief is a good thing. It gives permission to our needing to



SENIORS: WALKING THE JOURNEY TOGETHER

Jan 13th, 2012 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

It was not the most celebratory of holidays. It was fraught with bad news moments when telephone calls and emails notified us of the death or impending passing of a friend or a loved one. It almost seemed epidemic. Following on the contact came the necessary task of putting travel arrangements together, notifying others, packing and making ready for a strenuous journey which would involve about 12 hours. At such times, there is no excuse giving, backing out, or pleading helplessness. Being there with those you care deeply for and about is the only mandate to be accepted.

As I traveled several hundred miles to be present for the memorial service of my father-in-law, I was mindful of others who had died in the last few days: A member of a congregation I had served, a friend who had undergone a long and lingering fight with cancer, a friend who had lost her husband. It was not a happy time. It was a time for grief, a moment



Seniors: When Good Friends Die

May 23rd, 2011 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

It seems always a shock to learn of the death, particularly sudden death, of a good friend. That happened awhile back. It took me quite off guard. Only four years my senior, I had always looked upon him as a model, a mentor, a good and wholesome human being. He was quick witted, warm, a hale fellow well met.

He had served in elective office for twelve years. When he left that post, he was all done with politics. But, had he chosen, he would have been easily elected again. He was trustworthy, cared for his constituency and was a gentle man.

A farmer, just out of high school a year, it would become his role to follow in his father’s footsteps upon his death. He has a lovely spouse, a dear well respected brother and a successful son. His death was sudden and those who learned of it must



Dealing With Loss and Grief

Nov 10th, 2010 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: For Senior Women

We senior women are still living longer than our husbands—at least statistically speaking, women live on average about five years longer than men. That means we have experiences of grief over the loss of life-long companions and our social life can end up in shambles. We are also bright enough to know friendships and our [...]