Posts Tagged ‘ grief ’

THE RELIEF OF GRIEF

Aug 20th, 2013 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

More of long time acquaintances and dear friends are reporting the loss of a loved one. Many of the notices indicate the death of a parent, particularly mothers. We are, after all, many of us, at that age when the clock ticks faster and the calendar seems to be turned over too often, too soon.

Many have lost their fathers, years back. Men seen to have shorter life spans. And so, we spread out our grief, extending over several years, so that our adjusting to the loneliness and heart ache that inevitably comes is less difficult.

It is that that draws our attention today. Grief is a good thing. It gives permission to our needing to



LINGERING LONELINESS

Apr 13th, 2013 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

There aren’t words enough to reveal the feelings that come upon the death of a dear, sainted Mother. There aren’t emotions, poured out in tears and agony over the loss of the one who gave you life. There aren’t sentiments eloquent enough to describe the lonely hurt that overtakes you, the sudden flood of tears, the amazing emptiness that overtakes you.

But as the popular song suggests neither is there any “mountain high enough, no valley low enough to keep me from you.”

In spite of the alienation caused by the suddenness of death, the deep and abiding loneliness, the sudden and abrupt separation, one must find ways to keep the loving memory going.



SENIORS: WALKING THE JOURNEY TOGETHER

Jan 13th, 2012 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

It was not the most celebratory of holidays. It was fraught with bad news moments when telephone calls and emails notified us of the death or impending passing of a friend or a loved one. It almost seemed epidemic. Following on the contact came the necessary task of putting travel arrangements together, notifying others, packing and making ready for a strenuous journey which would involve about 12 hours. At such times, there is no excuse giving, backing out, or pleading helplessness. Being there with those you care deeply for and about is the only mandate to be accepted.

As I traveled several hundred miles to be present for the memorial service of my father-in-law, I was mindful of others who had died in the last few days: A member of a congregation I had served, a friend who had undergone a long and lingering fight with cancer, a friend who had lost her husband. It was not a happy time. It was a time for grief, a moment