WHY SECOND OPINIONS ARE ADVISABLE

Jun 23rd, 2013 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Seniors Seek Healthy Living

Several years ago, I was told that I had had a stroke in my left eye, affecting my vision rather significantly.  The visit to an ophthalmologist, following a checkup  with an optometrist. confirmed that indeed I had had a stroke and that, in their combined opinion, there was nothing that could be done for me.  I lived with that diagnosis for a number of years, finally visiting another ophthalmologist in a nearby city.

It was here that I was to learn that, indeed, something could be done. My history had included my having keratoconus and three corneal transplants during the period from the early 70′s to 2012. I was stunned to learn that during that time either technology had changed or the physician I had decided to see was both better equipped and more optimistic.

Now this many months later I have not only had a corneal transplant in that eye, but had a rather large cataract removed.  I am currently in recovery and beginning to have significantly improved vision in that eye.

Seek Additional Help and Advice

The moral of the story.  Don’t surrender to first opinions.  Pursue other options. Find a physician with a sterling reputation who may be willing to test previous assumptions.  When health issues are at stake, particularly those that compromise normal living, exploring options for correction or improvement are well advised.  In other words, DO NOT, hand over power to one medical professional’s opinion.

Years ago, when visiting doctors’ offices who were younger than I, I was suspicious of their capabilities.  Until I realized that these were they who had studied and met the requirements of a contemporary course of study.  This should mean that they were better equipped to recognize possibilities for addressing one or another health issue.  A lot can happen over a period of several years that could be in your favor.

Another experience reinforces this counsel.  In 1997, when I was up for another transplant, I was pointed to a physician who had a theory for dealing with my condition.  It was off the wall, unproven, and somewhat scary.  I chose to find another physician, who turned out to be the premier ophthalmologist in the state where we lived.  Caution reinforced the wisdom of that decision.



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