HEARING LOSS: AN AGING MALADY

Oct 24th, 2012 | By Dr Jerry D Elrod | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Signs of Hearing Loss

If the television volume seems too much for everyone but you, there is likely a hearing issue here. If you must ask persons to repeat what they have just said to you, you are likely experiencing hearing loss. If you can’t sort out what is being discussed in a small group, so that you can participate, you are likely undergoing hearing loss.

Embarrassment, inability to be a part of a conversation, irritation from having to ask for a repeat, difficulty in making out what is being said on the television, all of these are definite signs of hearing loss.

Doing something about it takes initiative and patience. There are as many brands of hearing devices as there are flavors of ice cream. Finding someone to trust in the hearing field may involve numerous interviews. Be prepared, the cost is not small and the benefits are sometimes questionable.

What To Do If You Suffer a Hearing Loss

  • First, seek out a hearing testing center at a local university. Getting information that is not profit driven is a good way to reassure you that you need to go further. Do not begin with someone who is trying to sell you something. Remember that free vacation, if only you will visit our time share project? If you don’t enjoy being pressured, stay away from the big ads and the promises of crystal clear hearing. Check out the Better Business Bureau for a run down on reputation and customer service issues related to hearing companies.
  • Second, be sure to ask a lot of questions. Universities do not sell hearing aids, so you will need to find a company/business that sells them. Find out everything you can about the problems associated with hearing devices. Talk to people who have used the company you are investigating. If a company is reluctant to give you names of persons, flee their presence.
  • Third, examine the warranty and service information carefully. What are the ongoing costs for batteries and other attention to keep the aid working properly?
  • Fourth, is the initial cost something you can afford? Cheap aids may be attractive because of their lower price, but how well and for long will they serve you and your needs?
  • Fifth, is there a policy allowing for testing the device so that you can do a trial run for your own real world situation? Is there a return policy? If so, what are the stipulations?
  • Sixth, if you have trouble hearing in small groups in restaurants and other public places, how does this device help correct that?
  • Seventh, shop around before committing. Because of the size of the investment for a hearing aid, be sure you have asked all your questions and are satisfied with the information you have received.

Hearing is one of the pleasures of living. Hearing loss affects our relationships and interactions with everyone. Be sure you get the best product you can afford when considering a hearing device. Then enjoy your new world of sound.



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