ARTHRITIS TREATMENT OUTSIDE THE BOX

Mar 9th, 2013 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Lifestyle, Health & Fitness

Arthritis: The Big Bug-a-Boo

Arthritis hits most seniors at some time in our lives. If the pain and discomfort is severe enough, we consult our primary care physician who prescribes an anti-inflammatory medication of one kind or another. If the doc is inclined to natural supplements, s/he may prescribe glucosamine-chondroitin or fish oils or herbs that may alleviate some of the pain.

As thirdage.com tells us, “…the secret is to make the remission periods last longer and longer and the flare ups be shorter and shorter as well as increasingly milder until they become almost insignificant.” If flare-ups of arthritic pain can be lessened and shorter in duration, the treatment is generally deemed successful.

Natural alternatives tend to be effective short-term. They may improve joint flexibility and lessen inflammation that causes injury to joints. Most important for us seniors to understand is that no matter what we read about arthritis, there isn’t any cure. Including alternative medical treatments.

Alternative Treatment

So what are some of the alternatives that seniors may want to consider for lessening arthritic pain?

  • my cousin, with moderate osteoarthritis, takes Omega 3 fish oils and Evening Primrose Oil; she believes these supplements alleviate some of the inflammation, and therefore the pain;
  • this author and her husband take glucosamine-chondroitin daily; a friend triples the dose, and he maintains it keeps him relatively pain-free (his physician approved the dose);
  • herbs that some people tout for arthritic pain include nettle, cinnamon and Angelica;

As always, this article is not offering medical treatment nor medical advice. Rather SCJ is sharing information gleaned on the Internet from people who experience arthritis and have found one alternative treatment or another to be helpful in managing the pain that accompanies this common disease. What helps one senior may not work for another. You need to continue to consult your primary care physician about treatment for your unique set of circumstances, and keep the door open for the possibility that one alternative treatment or another may work for you.

 



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