All entries by this author

Senior Citizens and Social Isolation

Apr 1st, 2020 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Eight years ago, a University of California San Francisco study revealed more than 40 per cent of seniors experience lonelinsss and a sense of isolation. As a result, they discovered these lonely seniors exhibited more health problems and even death.

Forty per cent is a lot of people. And now, during the COVID-19 Pandemic, seniors living along experience even more isolation than before the virus began spreading. We are ordered to stay home by local and state governments. We can’t go out and mix with people. We can’t see friends and family. We can only stay home. Alone.



Grocery Delivery: A Big Benefit to Seniors

Mar 31st, 2020 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Senior Citizen Journal writes a lot about how seniors can make the best use of their income and financial resources. After all, we don’t know how long we will live, and as a result, we need to plan carefully for our money to last an indefinite amount of time. This includes weekly planning for food and grocery shopping.

Tips in the 21st century include making good use of computers and cell phones for ordering. The newest technology of immeasurable benefit to seniors is grocery delivery. Most supermarkets, big box food stores and even smaller grocery stores will deliver groceries to families in their communities. Grocery delivery for seniors means we don’t have to get out in public and expose ourselves to COVID-19. We can ‘shelter in place’ at home and remain much safer.



Grocery Shopping Tips for Seniors

Mar 30th, 2020 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

As this message is being written, Planet Earth is in the midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Seniors are among the most vulnerable groups for experiencing complications from any virus and becoming seriously ill. Those over the age of 60 must stay home and away from people; we don’t know who may have the virus and not know it; as a result our habits must change, and that includes how we shop for groceries.

Sometimes we seniors need some reminders, and that’s the purpose of this message. In this day of staying at home and away from people, we still have daily tasks we must address. And grocery shopping is at the top of the list. Whether we order online or have someone shop for us, we have to make a list so we don’t end up with a bunch of groceries we don’t need and won’t use, and also so we indeed get everything we want for the week (or however long it is between shopping trips).



Seniors: Medicare Fraud Alert

Mar 20th, 2020 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Amongst the daily alerts we receive about COVID-19 is an email that comes from Medicare.com for those seniors who have an online Medicare account, and is one that all seniors need to understand and heed.

It just arrived in my email inbox, and begins, “Scammers may use COVID-19 as an opportunity to steal your identity and commit Medicare fraud. (emphasis added) In some cases, they might tell you they’ll send you a Coronavirus test, masks, or other items in exchange for your Medicare number or personal information. Be wary of unsolicited requests for your Medicare number or other personal information.”



PANDEMIC 101 for Seniors

Mar 19th, 2020 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

It is March, 2020, and world leaders have declared a Pandemic we call COVID-19, the corona virus that actually began in late 2019. It is a crisis for all of us, but especially for us seniors because we have been identified as among the most vulnerable group of people who can/could/might contract COVID-19. Seniors, people with lung disease, heart disease and diabetics are the highest risk groups.

A crisis is unexpected, frightening and potentially catastrophic for seniors. Our age creates a sense of vulnerability we did not experience in younger years. With that vulnerability comes heightened fear of the unknown future and its effects on our lives. Our ability to cope is diminished and even impaired.

Any crisis tends to diminish our resilience and ability to manage otherwise daily routines. Because our thought processes may be affected, problem solving and coping with ongoing daily routines can take a hit. That is just the nature of crises.



Home Protection for Seniors

Mar 26th, 2017 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

The home garage door offers one of the best options for thieves to break in to senior citizens’ homes. With the assistance of a small block of wood and a coat hanger, as described in this link, a garage door can be opened in about six seconds. And this kind of break in is becoming increasingly common.

Seniors use a variety of methods to increase their safety and reduce possibility of burglary, including alarm systems (monitored or not), security cameras and intricate locking systems on exterior doors



Medicare, Why Seniors Should Care

Jan 5th, 2017 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

The health industry continues to increase premium costs. This is why some insurance companies chose to opt out of ObamaCare in 2016. They were simply not willing to live with consumer-friendly requirements that bit into their profits. Ryan’s plan, “…would erode much-needed coverage and shift costs to many who live on fixed incomes and continue to struggle in the shadow of the Great Recession.” AARP Bulletin, January-February 2017

A full repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) would eliminate all the Medicare benefits created by the law, including free preventive services (flu shots and screenings for cancer and diabetes), savings on prescription drugs and the future of Medicare with a slow-down of spending, fraud, waste and excessive payments.



Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease, Part 2

Sep 9th, 2016 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Victims of AD need more structure in the Moderate stage. The generally experience sleeplessness, wandering, late-day confusion and agitation which are all part of the same problem. BAI Beacon states, “The damaged brain has to work much harder to understand the environment and be able to function.” (Ibid) People with AD tend to lose their sense of smell and need food that is well or highly seasoned; their eating is disrupted and the challenge for the caregiver is to find and prepare food that is appealing to their care receiver.

Persons in the Moderate stage of AD may resist bathing and need help to dress. They struggle to find words to express what they want to say. They begin to experience illusions and delusions.



Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease, Part 1

Sep 1st, 2016 | By | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Caregivers for family members and/or friends who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s find the availability of care-giving resources both helpful and encouraging. In particular, the explanation of stages of the disease and symptoms characteristic of each stage enable the caregiver to better plan for addressing the symptoms of Alzheimer’s. He/she can be somewhat prepared to help the person with Alzheimer’s mitigate some of the symptoms and make life more pleasant for everyone involved.

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

The first signs of a change in brain functioning (cognition) are generally mild and may go unnoticed. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute defines MCI as “…impairment in thinking skills that goes beyond normal age-related cognitive changes but does not meet criteria for dementia.”



Celebrating 80 Years of Social Security

Jul 9th, 2015 | By | Category: Social Security & Medicare

In 1935, the United States was in the depths of the Great Depression. You saved absolutely everything you had, including string. Every household had the ball of string that you added to whenever a new scrap came along. Most Americans had very little money to live on. And senior citizens were among the people who were hit hardest. Many could no longer work, and their families were having difficulty supporting themselves, let alone trying to support Grandma and Grandpa.

Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act August 14, 1935, and it saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of senior citizens, preventing almost certain financial ruin for each one.