Archive for June 2015

Be About Doing Good

Jun 26th, 2015 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

An interesting post appeared on Facebook recently that caught our eye. It was a poster that said, “We will never change the world by going to church. We will only change the world by being the church.” (emphasis added) If we knew the author, she/he would be credited here.

We have all known dozens of people in our lives who attend the church/synagogue/mosque of their choice, and profess their deep faith openly… and then their actions don’t match up with
their words. It almost borders on lying. Not telling the truth. It’s like the five year old bully on the playground professing he didn’t mean to hurt his playmate when he roughly pushed the younger, smaller child to the ground. “I’m a good kid who was only playing.”



Let’s Talk About Guns

Jun 22nd, 2015 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Let’s talk about guns today. Many, if not most, of us seniors likely grew up with guns in the house. I remember Dad’s guns were kept in a locked cabinet. He took the shotguns out every fall just before hunting season began in Iowa. He cleaned them and had them ready for opening day of pheasant season. That day, he and my younger tom-boy sister were up before dawn, heading out with friends to hunt pheasants in the cornfields surrounding the little town where we lived.

Our family met extended family members one day at a shooting range and we all shot at clay pigeons. At age 10 or so, I remember learning how to use a 4-10 shotgun that day. Daddy showed me how to follow the clay pigeon flying through the air, and pull the trigger when i had it in my sights. I followed the instructions, pulled the trigger when I thought I had it in my sights, and the clay pigeon shattered into a thousand pieces when the lead from the cartridge hit the flying object



Leaning On Others

Jun 16th, 2015 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

No matter how prepared we seniors think we are for change and loss, especially the death of friends and family, we’re still shocked when it happens. We experience a lot of loss as we age. It’s the nature of life.

However, the shock of loss seems to be related to the finality of death. When a loved one dies, life as we know it on this earth is done. Finished. No more conversations. No more walks. No more holidays together. It’s all over. The loved one is gone, and you are left to figure out how to live the rest of your life.



Respect for Elderly is a National Issue

Jun 14th, 2015 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

Presidential candidates are coming out of the woodwork now in preparation for the upcoming year of determining who will be the next President of the United States. All of the campaigns will address issues facing senior citizens in one way or another. Social Security and Medicare are at the top of the list of those issues.

Other concerns include financial security, medical care, and the place of seniors in a culture. Related to the latter, a recent Facebook post by the Bernie Sanders for President Campaign caught our eye. It is a quote by Pope Francis, our international catholic church leader and a man who seems to have his hand on the pulse of morality around the world.



Transitions and New Beginnings

Jun 12th, 2015 | By Sharon Shaw Elrod MSW EdD | Category: Senior Moments Blog

The Senior Citizen Journal dashboard says it’s been 18 months since the website has been kept current with new material added daily. Many of you followed Dr Jerry D Elrod’s Senior Moments regularly, and looked forward to his magical wordsmith-ing each and every day. Other, more research-based, articles were also added to SCJ on a daily basis… relating to lifestyle choices for seniors, finance, travel, Social Security, Medicare and all things important to senior citizens today. Dr Sharon Shaw Elrod, Jerry’s wife of 40 years, was responsible for most of those articles.

And now life has changed. Ready or not. Jerry died February 8, 2015, just four short months ago. He had been in serious decline for 18 months, and a gradual (sometimes imperceptible) decline for seven years. Health issues showed up with damnable regularity. Some were